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12 posts tagged with "graph"

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· 6 min read
Lukas Lösche

One of the key features of Resoto is its ability to collect data from a wide range of cloud providers, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), DigitalOcean, and Google Cloud Platform (GCP). This makes it easy to get a comprehensive view of your cloud infrastructure, no matter where it is deployed.

But, what sets Resoto apart from other cloud data collection tools is its ability to enrich the data it collects and make additional connections. This means that Resoto not only gathers raw data about your cloud resources, but also adds additional context and information that can help you better understand your cloud environment.

· 5 min read
Nikita Melkozerov

Hello folks! A few months ago, we released Resoto Notebook, a library that makes it easy to query, visualize, and analyze Resoto data using pandas, Plotly, and Jupyter Notebooks.

Today, we'll discuss Resoto's new JupyterLite support, which allows you to use notebooks in the browser without installing and launching a Jupyter server.

Want to analyze raw infrastructure data when only platform engineers can access cloud consoles? Or count infrastructure assets without a data scientist? JupyterLite is a JupyterLab distribution that runs entirely in a web browser, and Resoto's JupyterLite support gives you access to popular data analysis tools without the need for any additional installation steps.

· 10 min read
Matthias Veit

Today's world of cloud computing is complex. There are many cloud providers, each with their own set of services. Getting insights out of your infrastructure requires specialized understanding of the data from each service.

Properties in different services may have different names but the same meaning, or vice versa. To interpret properties, we need to ensure that values have a defined unit of measurement and one base unit. You can see the challenge if you imagine the many ways you can specify the size of a volume, the number of CPU cores, or even timestamps.

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· 12 min read
Matthias Veit

Kubernetes has dramatically improved the way we manage our workloads. It has become the de-facto standard for deploying and managing containerized applications, and is available in all major cloud providers.

A typical setup consists of distinct Kubernetes clusters for each application stage (e.g., dev, test, prod) or a cluster per tenant, and Kubernetes clusters shared between different users and teams often utilize namespaces and roles to control access. Deploying a single application to a Kubernetes cluster usually consists of tens to hundreds of resources (e.g., deployments, services, ConfigMaps, secrets, ingresses, etc.).

Even a relatively simple setup quickly becomes tedious to manage as the resource count grows. It is difficult for a human to keep track of resources, especially with user access limited to certain clusters in select namespaces.

· 13 min read
Lukas Lösche

Understanding what's running in your cloud infrastructure is important for a number of reasons—for example, security, compliance, and cost.

But sometimes, the cloud feels more like a black box that you're feeding with cash, and in turn it performs the work that makes your business run.

Sheep looking inside a black box

Even those spinning up cloud resources might only be aware of their small slice of the pie. With hundreds of thousands of interconnected resources, it is really hard to know what's going on!

Cloud inventory has become a new type of technical debt, where organizations lose track of their infrastructure and how it relates to the business. Resoto helps to break open the aforementioned black box and eliminate inventory debt.

· 2 min read
Nikita Melkozerov

We recently released Resoto Notebook, a library that allows for the visualization and exploration of the Resoto graph interactively using Jupyter Notebook.

Resoto Notebook is similar to Resoto Shell in the sense that you execute queries, but the results are returned in a pandas DataFrame structure. This gives you more flexibility in filtering, aggregation, visualization, etc.

· 6 min read
Matthias Veit

Resoto uses a directed graph to represent your infrastructure resources as nodes and relationships between them as edges. A load balancer for example is represented as node with edges pointing to all target compute instances. The compute instance might have a volume attached, where we would see an edge between the instance node and the volume node.

The nodes represent the actual resources. The edges define the relationship between the nodes. It is possible and highly likely, that one resource has multiple relationships to other resources.

Sheep Jumping on a Graph