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3 posts tagged with "devops"

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Lars Kamp
Jonathan Bernales

There is a new generation of companies that are building their applications 100% cloud-native, with a pure serverless paradigm. One such company is Ekonoo, a French FinTech startup that enables customers and organizations to efficiently invest in retirement funds.

Jonathan Bernales is a DevOps Engineer at Ekonoo. In this interview, Jonathan walks us through Ekonoo's approach of giving developers the autonomy to build and deploy code along with the responsibility for security and cost.

Holding developers responsible for security and cost is a rather new part of "shift-left." Cost awareness becomes part of the development culture. To keep cloud bills under control, Ekonoo developers are responsible for their individual test accounts and have access to the AWS Billing Console and AWS Cost Explorer.

At Ekonoo, there is no dedicated "production team." Rather, DevOps collaborates with developers to create guidelines and guardrails for architecture, automation, security, and cost. The entire Ekonoo stack runs on AWS using native AWS services such as CloudFormation, Lambda, and Step Functions.

Watch this episode to learn about Ekonoo's transition to a microservices architecture and the lessons learned along the way.

Lars Kamp
Andreas Grabner

Andreas Grabner is a DevOps Activist at Dynatrace, where he has fifteen years of experience helping developers, testers, operations, and XOps folks do their jobs more efficiently.

In this episode, Andreas and I discuss how the shift to cloud-native and more dynamic infrastructure is followed by a change in how developers, architects, and site reliability engineers (SREs) work together.

With the sheer quantity of resources running in cloud-native infrastructure and the monitoring signals produced by each resource, the only way to keep growing without "throwing people at the problem" is to turn to automation.

Andreas makes a noteworthy distinction between DevOps engineers and SREs:

  • DevOps engineers use automation to speed up delivery and get new changes into production.
  • SREs use automation to keep production healthy.

SREs are often former IT operations and system administrators responsible for physical machines, virtual machines (VMs), and Kubernetes clusters. As SREs, they move up the stack and become responsible for everything from the bottom of the stack all the way up to serverless functions and the service itself.

We dive into the differences between SLAs, SLOs, and Google's four golden signals of monitoring—latency, traffic, errors, and saturation. Andreas shares the example of a bank and how they started defining SLOs to measure the growth of their mobile app business versus just defining engineering metrics.

This episode covers "engineering for game days," chaos engineering, and making the unplannable, plannable. Andreas shares his perspective on the general trend to "shift left" and include performance engineering in the development and architecture of cloud-native systems.

Lars Kamp
Jon Edvald

Jon Edvald is the founder and CEO of Garden, an end-to-end cloud delivery platform that accelerates your development, testing, and CI/CD workflows.

In this conversation, Jon covers how the shift from monolithic applications to microservices has taken us from a single codebase to individual deliverables that are getting smaller and smaller. With the introduction of containers, an application now consists of many discrete components—which continue to get even smaller with the arrival of serverless. And where teams previously had to manage five to ten codebases, they are now dealing with hundreds or even thousands. Testing and deploying these different codebases has become a graph problem.

Beyond adopting containers and Kubernetes, the complexity of that graph of system components pushes the boundaries of existing DevOps tool chains. There is overhead for setup of each component in the graph, which becomes unmanageable with existing tools.

Garden solves this issue by factoring out things that are undifferentiated across different teams, allowing them to focus on their own business problems. Garden builds a directed graph of everything that needs to happen to transition from a bunch of Git repositories to a fully built, deployed, and tested system.

Listen to this episode to learn more about the industrialization of continuous integration (CI), infrastructure as code (with popular tools like Terraform and Pulumi), and how Garden helps developers ship more software faster.